Consistent Institutional Racism in Nunavut: 1962 – 2014

Sometimes I Think

The Qikiqtani Truth Commission’s final report, published in 2010, paints clear, stark and uncomfortable images of what life in Nunavut was like in the 1950s, 60s and 70s.

Uncomfortable because, as a conscious human being and a Canadian, I don’t want to believe the stories hundreds of Inuit who lived those years told the commission. Stories of forced relocation, forced quarantines thousands of kilomteres away from home, families left in the dark, families thrown geographically asunder—stories of pain and grief and regret, all archived and relived.

Uncomfortable because of the clear glimpses of stark racism that persist from those days.

In 1950 most Inuit in the Qikiqtani region (Baffin) lived in tightly-knit kinship groups, five to thirty people big, on ilagiit nunagivaktangit—seasonal land camps traditionally used for hunting, harvesting and gathering.

By 1975, almost all Inuit lived in permanent settlements, lured by promises of material security that failed to…

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About jhalladay13

Photographer, Knitter, Mother , Christian, Recovering, Victim, Survivor, Thrive, Activist, Reader, Church Singer,Learning Inuktitut language of Baffin Island Inuit. Community Leader, Activist, Advocate and Disrupter!

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